What does the wind symbolize in Inherit the Wind?

What does the wind symbolize in Inherit the Wind? The Wind Symbol Analysis As the play’s title indicates, the wind is a central symbol of Lawrence and Lee’s work. The line from Proverbs, quoted by

What does the wind symbolize in Inherit the Wind?

The Wind Symbol Analysis As the play’s title indicates, the wind is a central symbol of Lawrence and Lee’s work. The line from Proverbs, quoted by Brady and then, after Brady’s death, by Drummond, goes as follows: “He that troubleth his own house . . .

What was Cates punishment in Inherit the Wind?

Cates admits to a lack of public speaking skills and says that he is only a teacher. He calls the law he broke unjust and vows to continue to oppose it. He trails off mid-sentence and sits down. Glancing at the mayor, the judge declares Cates’s punishment to be a $100 fine.

What happens in Inherit the Wind?

The last thing that happens in Inherit the Wind is, after all the yakkity-yak, a silent action. Drummond takes up the Bible in one hand, Darwin’s The Origin of Species in the other, balancing the two books. He puts both of the books in his bag, showing that both of them are important, and leaves the stage.

What is the golden dancer Inherit the Wind?

Golden Dancer, a rocking horse Drummond received from his parents as a child, represents the deceptiveness of external beauty. Despite its bright shine and color, the horse broke the first time Drummond rode it.

Who inherits the wind?

He that troubleth his own house shall inherit the wind: and the fool shall be servant to the wise of heart.

Who won the trial in Inherit the Wind?

The jury finds Cates guilty, and he is fined $100. Brady protests the minimal punishment. Although he won the case, his victory is a hollow one. The real triumph belongs to Drummond and Cates, who win a moral victory for freedom of thought.

Did Bert win or lose Inherit the Wind?

Did Bert win or lose? He won. Even though he was found guilty, his sentence was very light.

Who won the case in Inherit the Wind?

Who wins the case in Inherit the Wind?

Who inherits the wind in Inherit the Wind?

The advice he gives to Reverend Brown is the wisdom of Solomon in the Book of Proverbs, “He that troubleth his own house . . . shall inherit the wind.” Brown has caused trouble in his own house by condemning his daughter and will, ultimately, “inherit the wind,” when Rachel leaves him.

Who paid bail for Bert in Inherit the Wind?

Who paid bail for Bert? Hornbeck paid bail for Bert.

What was golden dancer to Drummond?

Golden Dancer was a horse that Drummond begged his parents for as a young boy. When he got it, it broke (Drummond wanted it because it looked pretty, but it was all shine and no substance) because the wood was rotting. This is also a symbolism of Brady.

Who is the author of inherit the wind?

Inherit the Wind is a play by Jerome Lawrence & Robert E. Lee that was first published in 1955. Summary. Read a Plot Overview of the entire play or a scene by scene Summary and Analysis.

What happens at the trial in inherit the wind?

Drummond rails against Brady’s absolute notions of right and wrong. Drummond asks Howard if he understands what is being discussed. When the boy says no, he is dismissed. The prosecution calls Rachel to the stand. To explain why Cates stopped attending church, Rachel tells the story of Tommy Stebbins.

Who is Rachel Brown in inherit the wind?

Rachel Brown, a friend and fellow teacher who also is the daughter of the town’s minister, visits Cates. She brings Cates some clean clothes and urges him to plead guilty and throw himself at the mercy of the court. Cates remains firm in his resolve. Hillsboro erupts with excitement as prominent lawyers and journalists arrive for the trial. E. K.

What did Lawrence and Lee do after inherit the wind?

Lawrence and Lee went on to found the American Playwrights’ Theatre, and to write another blockbuster, The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail, along with thirty-odd other collaborative plays, many of them still performed today, and reinterpreted to highlight other, current debates in American society.